Podcast Ep 37: Krista Tippett On Why The Wisest People Are Always Smiling

By Team Mash-Up

Smile.

Photo credit: Peter Beck

Why The Wisest People Are Always Smiling 

Krista Tippett, creator of On Being and convener of the American conversation on spirituality, sits down with Amy and Rebecca to dig into the Big Questions: How does religion connect the soul to the body? What does it mean to live a spiritual life? How is humor a signal of spiritual depth? Where do we find joy? How do our roots inform our future growth? Also, what does it mean for your identity when your curly hair turns straight? (Seriously.)

Krista Tippett, Journalist, Theologian, And Girl From The Midwest

Krista receiving the National Humanities Medal from President Obama, nbd. Photo credit : AFP Photo/Mandel Ngan

Krista On Community And Faith

Community is one of the things people find in faith and in religious organizations that’s not a given in the rest of life anymore. In our time, many people grow up without much of a strong religious formation, especially compared to previous generations. Yet, this longing for community doesn’t go away, so we seek it and learn to pick up the spiritual search ourselves at some point in life.

But I see often, that when people do start walking down that path and taking it seriously, even if they pick it up independent of any kind of tradition or identity, at some point, they start turning to community and ritual. These are core aspects of faith that have been carried forward in time and across generations, along with the practices and the text and the teachings. They belong together.

The Songs That Bring Us To Our Knees

Listen to “Krista Tippett On Why The Wisest People Are Always Smiling” and subscribe to our podcast on iTunes or on your favorite audio app like Stitcher or TuneIn. Or just keep coming right back here. We’re in your ears, yo. Subscribe!
This podcast is produced by American Public Media and Southern California Public Radio, KPCC. It is supported in part by an award from the National Endowment for the Arts. To find out more about how the NEA grants impact individuals and communities, visit www.arts.gov.

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